BBC

Medúlla

Björk
Medúlla
[One Little Indian]
Released : 30 August 2004

Björk’s long-awaited Medúlla presented the Icelandic innovator with a challenge. Not only did she have to follow-up her breathtaking 2001 masterpiece Vespertine, but she also decided to do away with instruments. “I only wanted to work with vocalists,” she proclaimed in a recent magazine interview.

No instruments ? No problem. Welcome human beatbox artists Schlomo, Rahzel (of The Roots) and Dokaka. And many tracks still have a distinctly electronic edge, helped along by Björk’s longtime collaborator Mark ‘LFO’ Bell. Björk also has the most powerful instrument of all at her disposal—her voice.

Fans will feel at home with the opener, “The Pleasure is All Mine”, with those familiar trademark wailings and some pleasant Vespertine-like harmonies courtesy of an Icelandic choir. Many songs have a minimalist feel, such as “Show Me Forgiveness” and “Submarine” which features Robert Wyatt. The Icelandic “Vökuró” and “Sonnets / Unrealities XI” are full-on choral numbers with an almost religious tone to them. “Desired Constellation” is one of the more effective slow tunes, with Björk warbling over a background of delicate digi-noise.

It’s not all simplicity though. “Where is the Line” is a mish-mash of ideas, sounding like a fight between a choir and a rack of effects boxes, with neither winning. “Oceania” too, which opened the Athens Olympics, is spoilt by some overenthusiastic vocal whoopings. An Inuit throat singer called Tagaq is also brought into the mix, whose contributions range from unnerving (“The Pleasure Is All Mine”) to downright horrid (“Ancestors”).

This is not a radio-friendly album. There are no “It’s Oh So Quiet” moments here. The only really immediate tunes are the enjoyable “Who Is It” and the closing track “Triumph of a Heart” (listen out for the rather splendid human trombone on that one).

Medúlla has some high points, and it never gets boring, but it still left me feeling rather confused. It was recorded in 18 different locations, and you can tell—the end product feels disjointed and at times claustrophobic. Whereas previous albums like Vespertine were real growers, some people may lose patience with this one. The unquenchable desire to try out new ideas, which makes Björk such an exciting artist, may prove to be her downfall on Medúlla, as too much of the experimentation doesn’t quite hit the mark.

But I still can’t wait for her next album.

David Hooper

publié dans BBC - 30.08.2004

En lien avec...

 
 

Articles de la même année

 

2004

date
publication
titre
30.11.2003
Dazed & confused
26.03.2004
Houston Chronicle
13.07.2004
PopMatters
14.07.2004
PopMatters
01.08.2004
musicOMH
13.08.2004
The Independent
27.08.2004
The Independent
27.08.2004
The Guardian
28.08.2004
Télérama n°2850
28.08.2004
Télérama n°2850
29.08.2004
The New York Times
30.08.2004
The New Yorker
30.08.2004
BBC
31.08.2004
Prefix Magazine
01.09.2004
Musiquall.com
01.09.2004
DEdiCate n°4
01.09.2004
Wire
01.09.2004
Jam ! (Canoe.ca)
01.09.2004
BBC Manchester
01.09.2004
Stylus Magazine
01.09.2004
Dazed & Confused, 2004
02.09.2004
voir.ca
02.09.2004
L’Obs
03.09.2004
Entertainment Weekly
06.09.2004
Newsweek
06.09.2004
Entertainment Weekly Online
09.09.2004
The St. Petersburg Times
16.09.2004
Rolling Stone
30.09.2004
Trax n°77
01.10.2004
Diva Magazine n°101
02.10.2004
New Zealand Listener
12.10.2004
PopMatters
01.11.2004
Interview Magazine